Radiology provides Diagnostic and Therapeutic Imaging Services for ELHT. Images are obtained using a wide variety of specialist equipment and techniques, operated by a skilled team of Radiographers, Radiologists and Assistant Practitioners.

The following imaging modalities (types) are available:

Plain film radiology (X-Rays)

X-rays are generated using electricity, tungsten and a glass tube, similar to a light bulb.  When X-rays pass through objects, they are absorbed.  An X-ray detector is placed behind the part to be X-rayed.  The more X-rays which pass through the body and reach the detector, the darker the image, the less x-rays which reach the detector, the brighter the image.  Hard, bone like structures show up white on an x-ray, soft tissue areas show up grey and parts filled with air, show up black. Read more here

Fluoroscopy

Unlike a conventional x-ray image, fluoroscopy uses X-rays to image in real time.  This allows assessment of function and structure.  A good example of this is in Barium Studies.  Barium is a dense white liquid which block x-rays.  Because of this feature, it is shown on X-ray as bright white.  It can be used to assess conditions of the intestinal tract and using fluoroscopy can be visualized as it passes through.

Ultrasound

Ultrasound uses sound waves to produce images of organs and structures inside the body.  The sound wave is reflected back to the transducer (probe) and this creates an image on the TV screen.  Liquid Gel on the skin surface ensures that none of the sound waves are lost. Read more here

CT scan (Computerised Tomography)

CT is a very specialised type of X-ray examination.  A Tomogram effectively means ‘a slice’ or a cross section.  As one organ lies in front of another in the body, it would be difficult to see everything at the same time.  If the part in question and the machine producing the X-rays are moving at the same time, the structures behind and in front of the part of interest will be blurred out, leaving a clear picture.  CT scanners work by have an X-Ray tube which rotates around the patient at high speed.  The patient lies on a bed which moves through the X-rays as they rotate and this produces images of the internal organs.  Pictures produced can be back to front, side to side and top to bottom so that every corner of the body can be seen.

 Like for a normal X-ray, parts of the body absorb X-rays differently, therefore hard structures like bone will show up very bright white on a CT scan and soft structures like the lungs will show up very black.

MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

Magnetic Resonance Imaging uses a very large magnet to produce images of the body.  The magnet is called a Superconducting Magnet and is kept energised constantly by electricity.  As electricity produces heat, it is necessary to keep the magnet cool, so it is surrounded by a jacket of helium and Nitrogen gas.

The human body contains lots of water.  MRI relies on the Hydrogen atoms of the water to interact with the magnetic field and produce an image. Read more here

Nuclear medicine

Nuclear Medicine is an imaging modality that looks at the function of an organ rather than the anatomy.Most of the tests involve an injection similar to a blood test to administer a very slightly radioactive substance that goes to the organ of interest and emits gamma rays. After a time interval a Gamma Camera can detect the gamma radiation emitted and using computer software can be manipulated into images or statistics as required. Patients rarely get undressed as Gamma rays are less affected by passage through clothing than x-rays, the images tend to be unaffected by clothes and fastenings.The procedures are routine, safe and the radiation dose is not excessive. Read more here

Angiography and intervention

Angiography and intervention are examinations which use real time x-rays and conventional X-rays to image both organs and blood vessels throughout the body.  Very intricate procedures can be performed through a small needle, using wires and tubes.  In some cases this can avoid the need for invasive surgery

Where are services are delivered

With the exception of Angiography and intervention, all imaging modalities are available as both outpatient and inpatient services.  Please see below for availability of services by site and time.  

Plain Film Radiography (X-rays) – This service is available on all sites within the East Lancashire Hospital Trust. 

Opening times are:

The Royal Blackburn Teaching Hospital (no appointments necessary)

Monday and Friday 8:30am - 4:30pm

Tuesday 1:30pm - 4:30pm                                                               

Wednesday 8:30am - 7:30pm

Thursday 1:30pm - 7:30pm                                                           

Burnley General Teaching Hospital (no appointments necessary)

Monday to Friday 8:30am – 4:30pm

Rossendale Primary Care Health Centre

Monday to Friday 9am - 5pm (by appointment only)

Clitheroe Community Hospital

Monday and Thursday 9am - 5pm (by appointment only)

Pendle Community Hospital   

Monday  1:30pm - 5pm (by appointment only)

Tuesday 9am - 5pm (by appointment only)

Wednesday and Thursday 9am-12noon (by appointment only)

Blackburn LIFT Building, Barbara Castle Way

Monday – Friday 9am - 12noon and 1pm - 5pm (this department is closed between 12noon and 1pm)

Accrington Victoria Community Hospital

Monday – Friday 9am - 5pm (open access)

Monday – Friday 5pm – 8pm (by appointment only)

Fluoroscopy – This service is only available on the Royal Blackburn and Burnley General Teaching Hospital sites of the East Lancashire Hospital Trust. 

The Royal Blackburn Teaching Hospital – By appointment only

Burnley General Teaching Hospital- By appointment only

Ultrasound scanning is available by appointment only and is available on the following sites of the East Lancashire Hospitals Trust:

The Royal Blackburn Teaching Hospital – By appointment only

Burnley General Teaching Hospital - By appointment only

Blackburn LIFT Building, Barbara Castle Way - By appointment only

Rossendale Primary Care Health Centre - By appointment only

CT scanning is available by appointment only and is available on the following sites of the East Lancashire Hospitals Trust:

The Royal Blackburn Teaching Hospital – By appointment only

Burnley General Teaching Hospital- By appointment only

MRI scanning is available by appointment only and is available on the following sites of the East Lancashire Hospitals Trust:

The Royal Blackburn Teaching Hospital – By appointment only

Burnley General Teaching Hospital- By appointment only

Nuclear Medicine Imaging is available by appointment only and is available only on the following sites of the East Lancashire Hospitals Trust:

The Royal Blackburn Teaching Hospital – By appointment only

Angiography & Intervention is available by appointment only and is available only on the following sites of East Lancashire Hospitals Trust:

The Royal Blackburn Teaching Hospital – By appointment only

Radiology enquiries

Royal Blackburn Teaching Hospital 01254 734198 (all enquiries for Royal Blackburn, Accrington Victoria Hospital and Blackburn LIFT Centre).

Burnley General Teaching Hospital 01282 804090 (all enquiries for Burnley General, Clitheroe, Pendle and Rossendale Primary Care Health Centre)

Further information about all Radiology examinations can be found on the Royal College of Radiologists website by following the link http://www.goingfora.com/’ and selecting Radiology from the two coloured options on the picture of the hospital. 

Related sites

Further information about examinations can be found on the Royal College of Radiologists website.

Related pages